It has been estimated that an average person has approximately 60,000 thoughts per day, and 70% of them are believed to be negative! People generate negative and repetitive thoughts too automatically that they are totally unaware that it is happening. 

Do you rehash on the same things over and over again? Being fixated on the negative? Or can’t stop worrying about things which are out of your control? If your answers are ‘YES’ to the above, it’s time for you to build some mental muscle and declutter your mind as these mental habits waste time and your mental energy!      


Here are three tips to help you declutter your mind and rid yourself of the thinking patterns that keep you from reaching your greatest potential. 

#1 Get rid of the pity parties
Be on the lookout for language that implies you are a victim. Saying "No one understands," or "Bad things always happen to me," are red flags you're filling your head with garbage. When you catch yourself thinking that way, take a deep breath and identify one action step you're going to take right away to improve your life.

#2 Challenge your self-doubt 
You need courage, not confidence, to take action. So the next time your brain questions your ability to succeed, simply say, "Challenge accepted." Be willing to prove yourself wrong and acknowledge that your brain isn't always right.

#3 Distinguish worrying and ruminating from problem-solving
Schedule 15 minutes every day to worry and ruminate. When you catch yourself thinking about something outside those 15 minutes, remind yourself it's not time to worry yet. When you reach the scheduled worry time, sit down and worry. Then, you'll confine your worries to one small chunk of time rather than allowing them to take over your entire day.


When you spring clean your mind, you will have more time and energy to devote to positive and productive things; this will strengthen your mental strength. Always bear in mind, it is actually a choice you are making, start decluttering today and be on your way to becoming the best version of yourself!


Article was first published in https://www.psychologytoday.co...